Mark 60 Series

Mark 60 Series

Self-Operated, Jorlon Diaphragm

Mark 602 Series

Mark 601/602 Series

Self-Operated, High Flows

Mark 50HP/60HP Series picture

Mark 60HP Series

High Pressure Regulator

Mark 61 Series

Mark 61 Series

High Sensitivity

Mark 62 Series picture

Mark 62 Series

Internally Piloted Regulator

Mark 63CDF Series

Mark 63/64 Series

Differential, Jorlon Diaphragm

Mark 60 Series

Mark 65 Series

Downstream Vacuum Regulators

Mark 66/660 Series

Dome Loaded, High Accuracy

Mark 6769 Series

Mark 67/69 Series

Pilot-Operated, High Flow

Mark 675 Series

Wafer Style, Jorlon Diaphragm

Mark 68G Series

Globe, High Capacity, Accurate

Mark 686G Series

Mark 686G Series

Air-Loaded, Globe Trim, ANSI IV or VI

Mark 68HP Series picture

Mark 68HP Series

High Pressure Regulator

Mark 608 Series

Mark 608 Series

Gas Pressure Regulator, Balanced Plug

Mark 608BP Series

Mark 608BP Series

Balanced Plug, ANSI Class VI

Mark 608DS Series

Mark 608DS Series

Low Pressure Double Seated, High Capacity

Mark 608IS Series

Mark 608IS Series

Gas, Low Pressure, Internal Sensing

Mark 627 Series

Mark 627 Series

Gas Regulator, Self-Operated, High Inlet Pressure

Mark 630 Series

Mark 630 Series

Gas Regulator, Self-Operated, High Inlet Pressure

Mark 687 Series

Mark 687 Series

Piloted, Critical Pressure Reducing Applications

Mark 688 Series

Mark 688 Series

Piloted Soft Seat Regulators, ANSI Class VI

Mark 695 Series

Mark 695 Series (3/4″ – 1″)

Piloted, Very Low Set Points

Mark 695 Series – 2″

Gas Regulators, 2 inch, Internally Piloted

Mark 695X Series

Mark 695X Series

Small Tanks, Accurate Pressure Control

Mark 608UBAN Series

Mark 608BPM Series

Pressure Regulators

Mark 605MM Series Picture

Mark 608MM Series

Pressure Regulators

Mark 608UBAN Series

Mark 608UBAN Series

Pressure Regulators

Mark 6127 Series

Mark 6127 Series

Piloted, Liquid Pressure Regulating Valves

Y Strainer

Y-Type Strainers

Line Strainers

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For assistance choosing the right pressure reducing regulator for your application, use our sizing software program or contact your local representative.

How do pressure reducing regulators work?

Pressure reducing regulators monitor the downstream pressure and do not need any external power or air source to operate. Instead, they work by force balance. There are 4 main parts to a pressure regulator:

  • Set screw
  • Spring
  • Diaphragm
  • Plug

The compressed spring and diaphragm are the two opposing forces and the plug acts as the balance between the two. The set screw is used to show the regulator how much pressure we want by turning it to compress the spring. A compressed spring generates a force causing it to push down. This opens the plug and results in more flow (of water, air, or other media).

If there is a change in the controlled pressure, the diaphragm will be forced to move. For example, the pilot plug will allow upstream gas to flow under the diaphragm where the pressure is controlled by the position of the plunger. If any pressure exceeds your set point, the pressure below the diaphragm will be pushed up, closing off the pilot plug.

Benefits Of Using Pressure Reducing Regulators

Some benefits of using a pressure reducing regulator include:

  • Pressure regulators are much faster in response time because there is no need to go back to the controller.
  • Regulators can respond immediately to changes in the controlled pressure.
  • Regulators are usually easier to maintain and are cheaper to install.

Applications For Pressure Reducing Regulators

Our sliding gate pressure reducing regulators are ideal for steam, liquid and gas media applications. However, we also see use cases for the following applications:

Contact us for more information on the different applications of our pressure reducing regulators.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How do I choose a pressure reducing regulator?

How you choose a pressure reducing regulator depends on why you need it. There are five things you need to have to choose the right pressure reducing regulator with the right flow coefficient (Cv):

  • Upstream pressure: The supply pressure or inlet pressure going into the valve.
  • Outlet/Downstream pressure: The outlet is the pressure downstream of the regulator.
  • Pressure differential: The difference between upstream and downstream pressure is the pressure differential.
  • Flow range: Used so you don’t undersize or oversize the valve.
  • Temperature
  • Fluid type: Is it a liquid, gas, or steam? There is a big difference between saturated steam and superheated steam.

After you have correctly sized your regulator, you’ll then need to know the line size, material, type of connection, whether it’s a shutoff or not, and if it’s either direct or pilot-operated.

However, the most important things you’ll need to know in selecting a regulator for a specific application are what the flowing media is and what the desired flow rate is, and what the inlet and outlet pressures will be.

We have sizing software available to help with sizing a regulator so you know exactly what you need.

2. Does a pressure regulator reduce flow?

No, a pressure reducing regulator won’t reduce flow, you’ll need a control valve for that.

3. What size pressure reducing valve do I need?

If you’re not sure what size of pressure reducing valve you need, don’t hesitate to reach out to our experts for help. We also have sizing software available to help with sizing a regulator.